What’s New At Road 2017?

At Road to California, you can always expect fabulous quilts, great classes, terrific teachers, and wonderful vendors. It’s the premiere event to see and experience the latest in the quilting world.

Each year, we try to stay on top of the curve by adding exciting and innovative things to the show. What can you expect to see at Road 2017?

New Management: Road to California is family owned and operated. For the past 21 years, Carolyn Reese, her three sons and their families, have brought you the 2nd largest quilting show in the United States. This past year, Carolyn Reese retired and turned over the management of the show to her grandson, Matt Reese. Matt has held various responsibilities with the show since he was a pre-teen and for the past few years, has assisted Carolyn in running the show. A recent graduate of the California Bar, Matt divides his time between overseeing the day-to-day operations of Road to California and a budding law career focusing on family law.  

Giving Back: On Saturday night, attendees have the opportunity to participate in quilt-a-thon to benefit the Robert and Beverly Lewis Cancer Care Center. Roadies will be piecing tops, quilting tops and finishing quilts that evening.

The Pavilion: The front addition to the Ontario Convention Center is added each January exclusively for Road to California. Improvements this year to the pavilion include the removal of trees and street lights. The floor will be carpeted and the floor plan has been rearranged to be more accommodating for vendors and guests.

New Café: Located at the north end of the Convention Center, under the stairs, it resembles a famous coffee shop that shall not be named. Breakfast will be served as well as quick meal items for easy take and go. The grand opening for the café will be January 20th, so Road guests are the first to use it.

Outdoor Patio: Located near the north doors, there will be a fireplace and comfortable seating – the perfect place to rest and visit. If you are wondering what happened to the food venues that were previously located in the new patio area, the ice cream can be found in the food tent; kettle corn and roasted almonds will be between the pavilion and the exhibit hall.

Road to California Booth:  Where to find special souvenirs of the show. New this year include:

Artic Cups

Handmade bags made by Carolyn Reese featuring Road to California 20th Anniversary Fabric

Fold-up Grocery bags

(Note: California now charges for grocery bags. Show them and bring your own Road to California Bag!!)

The Road App: Our new app is easy to navigate. It gives real time announcements and changes to the show plus it allows you to keep your notes from classes and vendors long after the show ends.

Before you come to the show, download our app at IOS at www.konnected.co/ios or Android at www.konnected.co/android

Don’t worry…if apps aren’t your thing, you can download for FREE the Show Guide at http://www.road2ca.com/2017%20SHOW%20GUIDE%20copy.pdf 

Please note: A limited supply of Show Guides will be available to purchase at the event at the North and South Info Desks. However, once they are gone, they are gone.

We hope our guests will enjoy these changes and look forward to hearing their feedback.

 

 

 

Special Exhibit: Modern Quilts Redesigning Traditions

Road to California has partnered with the Ontario Museum of History and Art to present a special exhibit that explores the modern evolution of traditional quilt patterns.

The idea for the exhibit came from Carolyn Reese (owner of Road to California) and Pam Overton (President of Southern California Council of Quilt Guilds). They thought a Modern exhibit would interest not only Road to California patrons but Ontario Museum of History and Art patrons also.

The exhibit was curated by Georganna Hawley, immediate Past President of the Ventura Modern Quilt Guild. She began calling for entries after Road 2016 and resulted in over 80 quilts from talented quilters from the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

The Modern Quilt Movement is nearly 10 years old. It started in the early 2000’s with an online community of like-minded quilters. These artists were inspired by modern design, bold colors, extensive use of negative space and innovative piecing. Today, Modern quilters continue to embrace a style usually not seen in traditional quilts.

Most traditional pieced blocks are based on geometric shapes: squares, triangles, and circles. Early patchwork quilters used geometric blocks because they were easily fitted and sewn together, and could be arranged into hundreds of patterns. As individual quilters gained skill and confidence, the shapes and combinations became more challenging.

Today’s modern Traditionalist quilters choose original quilt patterns from the 1920’s – 1950’s and shrink them, enlarge them, move them off-grid, or simply improvise the piecing to redesign the block.

The exhibit opened to the public December 1, 2016 and will stay open until Road to California closes on January 22, 2017. The museum is opened limited hours and the exhibit is free.

Modern Quilts Redesigning Traditions will also serve as a backdrop for a Lecture and Trunk Show hosted by modern quilter, Latifah Saafir on Tuesday night, January 17, 2017 and a Meet and Greet for Modern Quilters on Friday, January 20, 2017. both events are from 6:00 – 8:00 PM and are free to the public. Reservations however must be made by calling the museum at (909) 395-2510.

Road 2017 Teacher and Vendor: Meet LauraJane White

LauraJane White will be teaching 2 evening classes on the Pleachét technique on Friday 5066C and Saturday 6061C 

Laura White crochets rugs at the Silver Dollar City National Harvest & Cowboy Festival.

Road to California 2017 is offering several “non-quilting” classes and one of those will be LauraJane White’s Pleachét  classes.  Pleachét is a technique used to build heirloom rugs from strips of old or new fabric. The fabric is loaded onto a needle — RugBeeRugNeedle TM and crocheted back off with carpet warp, leaving the material standing on edge to create plush rugs, chair pads and trivets.

The Pleachét process and the needle that is used, were designed by LauraJane’s grandmother, Laura Elizabeth Johnston. Her grandmother used it to carpet the family farmhouse, wall to wall, in Windsor, Missouri around the turn of the 19th Century.

LauraJane’s grandmother, Elizabeth Johnston, at a craft show in the early 30’s/40’s in the midwest

LauraJane remembers her grandmother dying her own wool strips and crocheting rugs, but is was LauraJane’s sister, Shirley Wood, who taught LauraJane the process. Shirley and LauraJane worked side-by-side for many years at the 1880’s themed craft park, “Silver Dollar City,” teaching and making their beautiful rugs.

The Pleachét Booth will be located at 2H in the Exhibit Hall and will feature the many styles of Pleachét from round, rectangle, and oval rugs to chair pads and trivets in both floral and geometric designs. Pleachét  tools will also be available. LauraJane enjoys interacting with her customers, sharing her family legacy and demonstrating a primitive craft that much of the world has never seen. 

In her classes, LauraJane will help her students create their own family heirlooms utilizing the Six Easy Steps of Pleachét:

*Choosing fabric and it’s preparation is key.

*Cutting appropriate width-size determining what your

 project will become.

*Proper loading of the fabric onto the rug needle to insure the

 neatness of your rug.

*Starting with the simplest of crochet stitches a chain stitch

 thus determining the shape of your project.

*Building the art work, one row at a time.

*Learning to finish your edges properly.

LauraJane hopes her students will learn “to embrace the importance of keeping the primitive arts alive in an all too disposable minded society” by discovering a new outlet to express their personal creativity in a one-of-a-kind, work of art.

This will be LauraJane’s first time at Road to California. She said she has heard that Road “is the creme de la creme of fiber art festivals” and that she is “so looking forward to this show.”

To learn more about LauraJane and the Pleachét technique, please visit her web site.

 

Safety and Security at Road 2017

The safety of our guests is a priority for both Road to California and the Ontario Convention Center. Here are a few of the precautions we take each year to ensure everyone has a pleasant experience while visiting our show:

Security Detail

Providing a quality experience that involves large crowds, over 200 classes and events, and more than 229 vendors and exhibitors, requires extra safety precautions. For the past six years, Road to California has hired special security detail to watch out for their guests. Their security personnel have extensive experience dealing with loss prevention with a big box retailer for over 20 years. They walk the show floor and hallways, scrutinizing body movements and behavior as they watch out for shoplifters and employees stealing from their employers. What advice do they have for our guests to help prevent possible losses?

  • Keep bags and purses close and in front of you.
  • Use Sack Sitters to manage your purchases. (Sack Sitters are from Boy Scout Troop 628. Located in the hallway of the Convention Center, the scouts give service and earn money for camp outs and other troop activities by watching over large purchases so guests don’t have to haul heavy items around all day).
  • At night, leave the convention center in groups. 

Safety support

The Convention Center hires a private ambulance service that is made available to assist guests with any medical needs they might have during the four days of the show. They are located at four stations in the Convention Center: under the stairs in the south lobby; in the pavilion tent; in the main hallway and in the north lobby.

The medics are ready and available to help with any kind of medical emergency before, during and after the show each day. Should a medical situation arise, medics advise that you “raise your hand for help” and someone will come to your aid. If they can’t handle a situation, they are prompted to call 911 and have an ambulance come to the convention center.

The medics report that falls are the most common medical situation they deal with at Road. To prevent falls from occurring, they recommend guests wear comfortable shoes, bring a friend to assist with special walking circumstances, proceed slowly and cautiously in crowded areas, and if you are used to using a walker or wheelchair, by all means bring that apparatus to the show.

Road to California is always watching out for our guests, especially when it comes to safety and security.

 

Road 2017 Special Exhibit: Altar Offerings

Altar Offerings, a Special Exhibit curated by Jane Tenorio-Coscarelli, is an exhibit that honors “our loved ones.”

In Mexico, the tradition of altar building is practiced for Dias De Los Muertos Or Day of the Dead which occurs October 31st to November 2nd each year. This multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. Building altars helps celebrate these lives.

Jane had the opportunity of taking an altar building class in Houston, Texas.  Being a fiber artist, she decided to design her altar in fabric. Later, when Jane was teaching her annual August retreat, she had her students create quilts for this exhibit.

Each quilt in the exhibit had to incorporate elements found in altar building which include motifs that symbolize earth, wind, fire, light and smell. In addition, the favorite food, personal items and activities, religious items and photos of the deceased loved one were also added.

Of the quilts in the exhibit, Jane said, “I am very proud of how each person expressed their loved ones. And many said it help them work through their passing. They turned their grief into a creative energy.”

After Road to California, Jane hopes the exhibit will be shown at future quilt shows in 2017.

Jane Tenorio-Coscarelli is a renowned author, artist and quilter and is the creator of 1/4 Inch Publishing. For the past 20 years, she has successfully designed and produced her product line of books, patterns, fabrics and notions. To learn more about Jane, please visit her website.

Jane’s Self Portrait

Road 2017 Faculty: Meet Linda Matteotti

Linda Matteotti will be  teaching two stand up, longarm classes :

Monday: 1015C  Begin with a Stencil 

Tuesday: 2016C  Simple but Amazing Projects on a Long Arm 

Four hands on, computer design classes:

Wednesday: 3007C  Mastering Electric Quilt Level 1  

Thursday: 4007C Mastering Electric Quilt Level 2

Friday: 5007C Electric Quilt – Foundation and Appliqué Patterns

Saturday: 6006C Art & Stitch for Longarm Digitizing  

And a half-morning drawing class:

Sunday: 7006C  Zentangle Drawing  

A  resident of Tempe, Arizona, Linda Matteotti is a versatile and qualified teacher. She is  a Handi Quilter Longarm Educator, an Art Stitch Certified Teacher, an Electric Quilt and EQStitch Instructor, and a Certified Zentangle Teacher (CZT). Besides Road to California, Linda has also taught as far away as Australia and South Africa.  When she’s not quilting, Linda does Zentangle drawing and book folding. 

How did Linda get started in longarm quilting? “I was not having much success with machine quilting on my domestic machine, so I decided to try free motion on a longarm. After achieving success on that, I am now able to quilt on a domestic machine or sit-down longarm with great results. After purchasing my Handi Quilter longarm in 2008, I became an Educator for them and have enjoyed teaching all over the world.”

Inspiration for Linda’s designs comes from “absolutely everywhere.” She thinks Pinterest is a “most amazing resource.” Some of her work has been quilting her mother’s beautiful embroidery creations.

What is the one quilting tool that Linda cannot live without?  “Electric Quilt (EQ7). I never make a quilt without it. Regardless of whether I’m piecing by machine or hand, applique or whole cloth. Every quilt I make begins it’s life as a layout in Electric Quilt.”

Linda’s favorite aspect of teaching is “watching the “lights go on” with her students, Her favorite moment is when she hears “that was worth the price of admission,” at the end of a class. Linda also hopes her students gain the ability to be independent with their quilting and designing. 

What is Linda’s best quilting tip?  “There are no “always” or “nevers” in your quilting journey. Explore different techniques and adopt the ones that work for you.”

You can learn more about Linda on her website.

 

Meet Road 2017 Vendor and Teacher: Janna Thomas

A Thanksgiving dinner in 2006 is what got Janna Thomas started with her business, Bloc Loc Rulers. Janna’s mom came with duct tape stuck to a ruler because she was tired of the rocking and slipping. Janna’s husband, Paul, being Mr. Fixit, took the ruler out to the garage and filed a groove in it. At this point the Thomas’ knew that they had to start their business. It took a couple of years to get their seed money to start things up and their company began selling rulers in 2009.

Janna and Paul live and run their business in Loveland, Colorado. Janna says that people might think that when she’s not running the business with Paul, there would be other things that she would like to be doing. But she insists that she “absolutely love(s) quilting and “ and isn’t interested in doing anything else. Janna keeps thinking “that when I’m an old woman I’ll try to take in some knitting and gardening, but honestly, I know there’s no room for that..quilting is too much of an obsession.”

What does Janna like most about her business? “I love seeing the happiness quilters have when they use our rulers because their projects turn out better than the way they’d hoped. The most wonderful thing is, they will come up to us at shows and show me photos and talk about how Bloc Loc has made their quilting an absolute joy.

The Bloc Loc Rulers vendor booth will be featuring a new ruler, the Pineapple Ruler. It gives the quilter two strip width options, any size center for the square in a square, any pineapple block size and rulers can be combined for special effects. The Pineapple Ruler is very easy to operate and making the block is very easy. Another new addition in their booth is Bloc Loc’s Traction Tape, a completely non-slip material that quilters can peel and apply to rulers they already own. The most wonderful aspect to Traction Tape is its ability to stay adhered to a ruler for a very long time and can turn up to 8 layers of fabric without a turning mat.

In addition to working the Bloc Loc Rulers booth, Janna will be teaching three classes that incorporate many of the company’s rulers. Janna will be teaching on Monday, 1010C Millefioiri

Tuesday, 2014C  Blooming Cogwheels

and on Wednesday,  3019C A Tarted Up Pineapple  Janna says that she loves “helping students learn in any way possible. Seeing them get excited about doing things they never thought they could do is extremely rewarding.” Janna feels it is important that her students  realize they can do anything in quilting; there’s always a way to achieve what they want to do and it doesn’t have to be difficult.

Janna and Paul can’t wait to come to Road to California 2017.  They consider Road to be “theworld’s biggest and best quilting bee, filled with friendship, learning and magnificent shopping.’ Whether in the classroom or the demoing in their booth, Janna is always ready to teach how to pull off the best techniques at the right time, and how to set her customers up for success in every quilting situation

To learn more about Bloc Loc Rulers, please visit their web site.

 

Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Jacqueline Kunkel

Jacqueline Kunkel will be teaching on Wednesday, 3006C Proud Mary

Thursday, 4006C Seeing Spots

Friday, 5006C Island Breeze

and on Saturday, 6703C Vintage Compass

Jacqueline Kunkel, her husband, and her two “wonderful Quilt Inspector Kitties,” recently completed a cross country move from Connecticut to Mesa, Arizona. Why the move? Jacqueline had been coming to the valley since her grandparents moved there in 1970.  Jacqueline and her husband had been going to Arizona for about 30 years.  She has lots of family there (Mom and Dad, Cousins, Aunt and Uncle), so  they have developed a love for the desert and Arizona.

Jacqueline blames her husband for her start in quilting. When she was pregnant with their first child, he suggested that Jacqueline get a hobby.  At the time, she was a garment sewer and heavy into making baby clothes for their newborn.  She took a formal quilting class, at her husband’s urging, and hated it.  She says it was probably because of the format in which it was taught: cutting cardboard templates with scissors.  No rotary cutters, mats and rulers.  Eventually, Jacqueline took another class that had all those things and she” was hooked!!!”  That was in 1993 and it has been her hobby turned business ever since then.

When Jacqueline is not quilting, she and her husband “LOVE” to hike, walk, explore, and fly (Jacqueline’s husband has his own little plane).  They fly almost every day as the Arizona weather “is just sunny and gorgeous.”

What is the one quilting tool that Jacqueline can’t live without? Her glue pen.  Jacqueline says, “I use it essentially in place of pins.  It allows my fabric to lay flat and I can handle it with ease.  From paper piecing to appliqué, to binding, there really isn’t anything you can’t use it on.”

When it comes to teaching, Jacqueline absolutely adores “seeing my students creating and then seeing the finished projects.  I also love helping them through the process.  It is very rewarding.” She hopes that her students walk away with more than one new tip or technique” that they can apply to their quilting in general. 

Jacqueline’s best quilting tip is that she does not use steam in her iron. She always uses a dry iron as she has found over the years that steam will stretch the fabric which results in a block not fitting properly or not being square.

In September, 2015, Jacqueline published a new book, Splash of Color:  A Rainbow of Brilliant Black and White Quilts.

Jacqueline says that “It was born out of a desire to write about something that I love… black, white, and bright fabrics. These are fabrics that my stash is not lacking in any way shape or form.  I loved designing the quilts in this book, and better yet, thoroughly enjoy teaching them too.  I love the photos that my students and other quilters send me of their completed projects.  It is very satisfying and fulfilling… (The book) is fun, the designs are versatile, and black, white, and bright fabrics are timeless!!”

To learn more about Jacqueline Kunkel, please visit her website.

Road 2017 Special Exhibit: Kona Color of the Year 2016

Do you know the Kona Color of the Year?

Each year, Robert Kaufman creates one new, LIMITED EDITION Kona Cotton Color of the Year, which is only available within that designated year and retires at its conclusion. The 2016 Color of the Year, Highlight, is a bright and refreshing yellow hue that can be a delicate addition, a bold accent, or steal the show altogether.

When the Color of the Year was originally announced, Robert Kaufman had a block contest on Instagram (#konaCOTYchallenge). The challenge was so popular that the idea was further developed into an exhibit of mini quilts. Robert Kaufman partnered with 60 of the industry’s leading quilters to bring about the Kona Color of the Year Special Exhibit.

Each of the designers have a special relationship with Robert Kaufman. Some are Robert Kaufman fabric designers, some have made quilt patterns for Robert Kaufman in the past, and others are artists the company admires. Robert Kaufman tried to pick people with a wide range of quilting styles so that the exhibit would be a well-rounded showcase of amazing quilts.

The exhibit is made up of 60 diverse quilts for every kind of quilter. The designers of the exhibit were each given an assigned color palette to create their 20” square mini quilts.

The company’s favorite part of the exhibit was seeing each of the quilts for the first time as the makers sent them back to them. It was such a special surprise to see what the designers created and how they used the Color of the Year, Highlight. The only direction was given the quilters was to make something truly “them” and they all created quilts that showcase their amazing styles and personalities.

Kona Color of the Year 2016 first debuted at the Fall 2016 Quilt Market/Festival. After it’s showing at Road to California, the exhibit will be displayed at QuiltCon in Savannah, Ga (Feb. 2017); Quilt Festival Chicago (April 2017) and AQS Quilt Week in Paducah, KY (April 2017).

 

 

Egyptian Ancient Craft Is Returning To Road

Once again, Road to California will be hosting two Egyptian tentmakers, sharing their ancient craft and culture through demonstrations in classes and on the vendor floor.

Tarek Abdelhay and Hosam Hanafy first came to Road in 2015, presenting the exhibit Stitch Like An Egyptian. Guests were fascinated at watching the men demonstrate their version of appliqueing – a dying art form that has survived centuries of Egyptian history, being found in Pharaohs’ tombs. Originally, this type of artwork used to line tents or screens covered in appliqué that could decorate a whole street. The brilliantly colored appliqué are still used today for ceremonial purposes at weddings, funerals, henna parties, or Ramadan celebrations.Egyptian Exhibit

Hosam is a tentmaker through and through. An attorney by profession, Tarek is not practicing currently so that he can focus entirely on his tentmaker work. They will be in Ontario, California for the full week during Road 2017. In addition to their show duties, Tarek and Malik enjoy shopping at the Ontario Mills shopping mall and visiting a local Egyptian market and mosque. Most of all, they love interacting with Road’s guests.

Photo courtesy AQS

Photo courtesy AQS

At Road 2017, Hosam and Tarek will not only be demonstrating their ancient craft and culture on the vendor floor at the front of the main hall, but will also be assisting their good friend, interpreter and Road faculty member Jenny Bowker.  Students  will have the once in a lifetime opportunity to learn along side Tarek and Hosam  during Jenny’s three separate Tentmaker Appliqué classes that she is teaching on Monday ( 1001R), Tuesday (2001R), and Wednesday (3002R).egyptian-quilts

And exclusive to Road 2017 attendees, Hosam and Tarek will have available close to 100 pieces of their ancient artwork to purchase, ranging from $100 to $1,500.  egyptian-quilts2

Having these tentmakers at Road 2017 is one way to help preserve their ancient art and culture. This intricate craft has been facing struggles, as machines try to replace hand-made items and unscrupulous businesses copy and sell their unique designs. Road hopes to bring attention to the beautiful yet shrinking art of the few remaining tentmakers who continue to practice their trade.